PART 2 – TRANSNATIONAL PRESENTERS AND SESSIONS AT 4C15

by Transnational Writing SIG Social Media Gruop

KEY WORDS: #transnational, #international, #global, #[other countries], #translingual

This is the second part of a two-part list, which is the result of a quick search on 2015 CCCC online program using the above key words. The actual number of international presenters and sessions with transnational, cross-cultural, and multilingual themes is evidently much larger. We hope that this two-part blog post will save you some time toward finding interesting events to go to. Part I is here.

  1. Katie Gindlesparger Philadelphia University, PA, Writing Abroad: The Risk and Reward of Teaching and Learning in Non American Settings
  2. Katja Thieme University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada – Indigenizing Canadian Higher Education: Shifting Writing Assignments in Indigenous Studies Courses
  3. Kirk St. Amant East Carolina University, Greenville – Achieving Intercultural Competency through Glocal Media Innovation Addressing Communication Requirements
  4. Kirk St. Amant East Carolina University, Greenville – Virtual Communication Across Real Borders: How Geographically and Culturally Dispersed Writers Collaborate and Interact
  5. Kurt Spellmeyer Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ – Buddhist Rhetoric in East Asia
  6. Lacey Beer University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada – Translingual Directions for Technologically Mediated Composing Platforms
  7. Lama Abdo Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon – Multiple Intelligences in English College Writing Classes
  8. Laura Pigozzi University of Minnesota – Taking risks with the upper division writing curriculum–visualizing rewards for domestic students and teachers
  9. Leigh Ann Dunning Indiana University of Pennsylvania – Translingual Strategies to Enact an International Vision for Writing Centers
  10. Leslie Seawright Texas A&M University at Qatar, Risking our Foundations: Transnational Research and Teaching at an IBC in the Middle East
  11. Levent Balcioglu Istanbul Sehir University, Turkey – Longitudinal Tracking of Turkish L1 University Preparatory Students Writing in English: A Two-Year Retrospective Study with Implications for Teaching and Curricula
  12. Lia McCoskey Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey – Assessing Gaps in Student and Instructor Perceptions to Facilitate Teaching in the ESL Classroom
  13. Ligia Mihut Barry Univeristy – Escritura en and con las comunidades | Writing in and with communities | Scrisul cu si in comunitati
  14. Lucia Thesen University of Cape Town, South Africa – Risk in Postgraduate Writing: Working with Dilemmas in the Writing of Research
  15. Luís Barbeiro Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Portugal – Research on Academic Writing in Portugal – Different Paths, Multiple Problems Characterizing Writing Practices
  16. LuMing Mao,Miami University, Ohio – Respondent: The Emergence of Global Rhetorics: from Local to Cosmopolitan
  17. Margaret Willard-Traub University of Michigan-Dearborn – The Action Potential of Transnational Writing in the Corporatized University
  18. Maria Jerskey LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, Sea Monsters, Writing Whisperers, and Literacy Brokers: The Risks and Rewards of a Translingual Orientation in College Composition
  19. Marina Fedosik New York University, NY, Seeking Sources: How International/ELL/SLW Students Search, Read, and Write from Sources
  20. Martha Townsend University of Missouri, Columbia, Writing Abroad: The Risk and Reward of Teaching and Learning in Non American Settings
  21. Mary Scott University of London – Chronicles of Time and Place: Learning from Transnational Postgraduate Students’ Reflections on Writing Academically
  22. Marylou Gramm University of Pittsburgh –Beyond the Monolingual
  23. Meghan Hancock University of Louisville – Innovative Responses to Struggling Graduate Writers: Reexamining the Genres We Teach and How We Teach Them
  24. Melanie Brinkschulte Goettingen University, Germany – Multilingual Writing for Students in Natural Sciences
  25. Melanie Carter American University in Cairo – But Is It Revolutionary? The Politics of Risk in an Egyptian Classroom
  26. Michael Bernard-Donals University of Wisconsin-Madison – Jewish Rhetorics and/as Global Rhetoric
  27. Michael Charlton Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph – Crossing an Ocean: The Risks and Rewards of Developing an International Graduate Program Collaboration
  28. Michael MacDonald University of Michigan-Dearborn – Contact and Commodity: Teacher Practice in Transnational Contexts
  29. Michelle Cox Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, Teaching for Agency: The Risks and Rewards for Multilingual Writers
  30. Ming Fang Florida International University – Rewarding yet risky: training the mainstream composition faculty to work with multilingual students
  31. Mohammed Al Alawi Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman – Decision Making during Assessments of English Writing in a University Context in the Sultanate of Oman
  32. Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar – Who Holds the Pen? Feedback and Writing Instruction
  33. Monica Tapia Ladino Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepcion, Chile – Main milestones of academic reading and writing in Latin America: A study from eight leading scholars
  34. Mudiwa Pettus The Pennsylvania State University – Rhetorical Archaeology: Recovering Sutton Griggs’s Imperium in Imperio as a Site of Rhetorical Education
  35. Mysti Rudd Texas A&M University at Qatar, Risking our Foundations: Transnational Research and Teaching at an IBC in the Middle East
  36. Nancy Small Texas A&M at Qatar/Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Risking our Foundations: Transnational Research and Teaching at an IBC in the Middle East
  37. Natasha Chenowith Kent State University, OH – Preparedness for Academic Writing in Doctoral Studies: English Language Learners as Scholarly Writers
  38. Nick Vagnoni Florida International University – From risk to rewards: Engaging academic writing tasks to sensitize students to multilingualism
  39. Olga Menagarishvili Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta – Audio Self-Reflection in an Advanced Technical English Course at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden
  40. Patricia Warman-Cano Florida International University – Problem solving with Paulo Freire: Promoting global citizenship and improving critical-thinking skills through themed, research-based projects
  41. Pavel Zemliansky University of Central Florida – Virtual Communication Across Real Borders: How Geographically and Culturally Dispersed Writers Collaborate and Interact
  42. Pearl Pang Are you more like Fan Shen or Min-zhan Lu? And does it matter? Attempting translingual practice where monolingual beliefs rule
  43. Pravin Soni University of Tampa, FL – Motivating Basic Writers: A Non-Apartheid Approach
  44. Rachel Griffo Indiana University of Pennsylvania – Translingual Practice: From Theory to Pedagogy, A Response
  45. Rebecca Fremo Gustavus Adolphus College – Business as (Un)usual: A Grassroots Approach to Supporting Multilingual Students
  46. Rebecca Lorimer Leonard University of Massachusetts, Amherst – Literate Resources and the Value of Language
  47. Rich Rice Texas Tech University, Lubbock – Teaching Composition in Diverse, Global Contexts through Agile Growth Design
  48. Robert Affeldt Adams State University, Alamosa, CO, Multicultural Rhetorics: Locating Habitus in the Spaces between the Words
  49. Rochelle Gregory North Central Texas College, Gainesville – “Project Xtreme”: Transforming At-Risk Students’ Academic Behaviors and Creating Contextual Learning Environments Composition I
  50. Ruilan Zhao The Ohio State University, Columbus – Understanding multilingual students’ experiences with academic synthesis writing: From a translingual approach
  51. Sandra Gollin-Kies Benedictine University, Lisle, IL – Development of specificity in first year writing through elaboration of the nominal group.
  52. Shawna Shapiro Middlebury College, Teaching for Agency: The Risks and Rewards for Multilingual Writers
  53. Shereen Inayatulla York College, CUNY – Contact and Commodity: Teacher Practice in Transnational Contexts
  54. Shurli Makmillen University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada/University of Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada – Indigenizing Canadian Higher Education: Shifting Writing Assignments in Indigenous Studies Courses
  55. Soyeon Kim Korea Institute for Curriculum and Development, Seoul – Multilingual writers’ voices in poetry as a research method: Meaningful literacy in Sijo, a Korean poetry genre
  56. Steffen Guenzel University of Central Florida, Orlando – Revisiting the Prussian Education Model Two Centuries Later: How Do Longstanding Practices and Values Impact Writing Instruction In Germany Today?
  57. Steven Alvarez University of Kentucky, Lexington – “Mexington, Kentucky”: Toward a Culturally Sustaining Composition Pedagogy
  58. Swantje Lahm University Bielefeld, Germany – Metaphors We Teach and Learn By: Their Impact on Implementation of Writing-Intensive Teaching in German universities
  59. Thomas Lavelle Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden – Risky Dispositions
  60. Toni Francis The College of The Bahamas – Critical Literacy in the Postcolonial Caribbean: Assumptions, Approaches, Assessment
  61. Vassiliki Kourbani Hellenic American University, Athina, Greece – Writing Center (WC) Synchronous Online Feedback: Discovering Ways Tutors and Tutees Co-Construct Their Roles within Multimodal (WC) Tutorial Sessions
  62. Vivette Milson-Whyte The University of the West Indies, Mona – Writing Abroad: The Risk and Reward of Teaching and Learning in Non American Settings
  63. Wei Cen Bowling Green State University – Lessons for Whom? Lessons from Whom?: A Second Look at Pan Chao and Lessons for Women
  64. William DeGenaro The University of Michigan Dearborn – Risking A Transnational Ethos in a Basic Writing Program
  65. Yunye Yu Georgia State University – Beijing Mongolian Language and Culture School Project: A Case of preserving and promoting “minority” culture through literacy movement in a multi-cultural society
  66. Zsuzsanna Palmer Old Dominion University, Monolingual ideology and translingual practice in multimodal classroom spaces
This entry was posted in Translingual Practice, Transnational Writing. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to PART 2 – TRANSNATIONAL PRESENTERS AND SESSIONS AT 4C15

  1. Pingback: TRANSNATIONAL PRESENTERS AND SESSIONS AT 4C15 – PART 1 | Transnational Writing

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